Author Archives: drsamoakley

About drsamoakley

Research Librarian at Swansea University

Resources from “Stand out and be counted”

We ran an updated version of our “Stand out and be counted” session for researchers this week. This time we have hosted all the resources on a Padlet:

Made with Padlet

The presentations are at the bottom of each column, apart from “Open Research” which was just an activity we did around a coffee break.

Many thanks to all those who came and participated!

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How to comply with the UKRI (RCUK) open access mandate

Post by Caroline Rauter

Research Council Open Access (OA) block grant 2018-19

Swansea University continues to benefit from the UKRI (formerly RCUK) block grant to pay publisher Article Processing Charges (APCs). The funding, which applies to all published outputs resulting from funding by the Research Councils, has been extended to run until March 2020. We are now in year six of the RCUK Open Access (OA) policy.

Swansea University operates the block grant on a first come, first served approach. 

UKRI (RCUK) OA compliance targets 2018-19

The Research Councils’ OA FAQs stipulate that their preference… “is for unrestricted open access (Gold)”, but they support a mixed approach for going “gold” or using “green” self-archiving in a repository:

  • As an RCUK funded researcher you are obliged to make 100% of your research outputs open access and you should ensure that all relevant acknowledgements are included.
  • Swansea University reported an overall compliance rate of 5% in April 2018 (using both the green and gold routes).

We are required to improve the Swansea University open access compliance rate in 2019.

Licences compliant with the UKRI (RCUK) OA policy

i) Gold route (immediate open access) using a Creative Commons CC-BY licence.

ii) Green route (deposit of the final accepted manuscript in RIS & Cronfa, usually with an embargo)

  • Of note is the requirement that the publisher copyright licence places no restriction on non-commercial reuse, including non-commercial text and data-mining. The licence should allow for the sharing of adaptations of the material. This means a CC-BY-NC-NDlicence is not
  • This brings authors into conflict with the funder policy when publishing using the green route in, for example, an Elsevier hybrid journal. You should apply for financial support using the gold route if this is applicable for your chosen journal.
  • Where publishers offer a gold route, but the researcher chooses green, papers should be published in a journal with a maximum embargo of 6 months for STEM funded disciplines, or 12months in the arts, humanities and social sciences funded research. Research papers in biomedicine should be published with an embargo of no longer than six months.

iii) Open Government Licence (OGL) Crown Body employees only, e.g. Welsh Government.

In support of sustainable and affordable OA options we encourage authors to consider publishing in:

  • Reputable, fully OA journals found in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).
  • Journals where the publishers are transitioning hybrid (subscription) to OA, for example: American Chemical Society, Cambridge University Press, IEEE, IOP, Oxford University Press, Sage, Springer, Taylor & Francis and Wiley.

We currently have institutional open access discount deals with MDPI, Sage, Springer and Wiley.

Contact us: Openaccess@swansea.ac.uk      T: (0)1792 604567

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“Stand out and be counted” – session for researchers

Flower_Pixabay

Back by popular demand! This is a half-day workshop to explore tools that can help you promote yourself and achieve the best visibility for your research. We aim to give an overview of the following:

  • What can be counted about you? Citations, altmetrics and a look at the Scival benchmarking tool
  • Your online identity – what are the pros and cons of maintaining profiles such as ORCID, Google Scholar and university systems (Cronfa, RIS & staff web pages)?
  • Online networking and social spaces for researchers

The workshop is aimed at researchers with some publications but PhD students are also welcome to attend. Booking is essential – reserve your place now:

Feedback from previous courses:

“I think this course should be mandatory for all new research staff. There were so many things I’ve never heard about and I found out my manager was on all the networks etc but she’s never told me about any of it. I’m telling everyone I know”

“I have changed my attitude 180 deg and noticed the importance of self-promotion online that could potentially enhance my employability and also contacts with people I could meet on conferences and seminars. I wish I had attended this course during my PhD so I could have enjoyed the profits of ‘standing out and being counted'”

 

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New report on UK Open Access Compliance

The front page of the report

Research England (formerly HEFCE) has announced the release of a new report: “Monitoring sector progress towards compliance with funder open access policies” (PDF). This reports the results from a UK-wide survey conducted in late 2017 looking at how universities are managing compliance with the REF, UKRI (formerly RCUK) & other funder open access policies.

The widely-reported headline finding has been “Over 80% of research outputs meet requirements of REF 2021 open access policy” but Cambridge University’s Danny Kingsley has written in response on their “Unlocking Research” blog: “Compliance is not the whole story” picking up a key point made in the report, that “the increased open access to research is resulting from considerable effort on the part of researchers, libraries, research offices”.

Read the report here (3 page Executive Summary available!)

Helen Snaith’s blog post for Research England: “REFlecting on progress towards open access

David Sweeney for WONKHE: “Open Access – are we almost there for REF?”

Danny Kingsley’s response “Compliance is not the whole story”.

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Filed under Open Access, REF, Research News

Open Access self-archiving rights for Book Chapters

annelies-geneyn-148582-unsplash

Photo by Annelies Geneyn on Unsplash

Publisher policies for the self-archiving of book chapters (“green” open access) are often hard to find and, when found, hard to keep as URLs change frequently. Unlike the Sherpa Romeo database, there is no centrally maintained database for publisher policies for self-archiving book chapters apart from a community-maintained Google Sheet which is a reflection of the hard work and generous, collaborative spirit of librarians and staff supporting open access.

Publisher policies vary greatly in the small print; the general trend is that only one chapter of an edited collection can be made open access on a repository. Nearly all policies refer only to the accepted manuscript, which has the final text after peer review but no publisher formatting (see our post on this version, with examples).

Policies for some of the most common publishers (at Swansea University) are given below.

  • Bloomsbury: the accepted manuscript can be made open access after an 18 month embargo.
  • Brill: the accepted manuscript can be made open access after a 24 month embargo
  • Cambridge University Press: the accepted version of one chapter can be archived on a repository after a 6 month embargo.
  • De Gruyter: the published version can be made open access after a 12 month embargo.
  • Edinburgh University Press: book chapters and whole monographs can be made open access after a 36 month embargo.
  • Elsevier: book chapters cannot be made open access.
  • Emerald: the accepted version of book chapters can be made available on a repository at publication.
  • Oxford University Press: the accepted version can be uploaded to a repository after an embargo (12mo STEM, 24mo humanities & social science). There is a complex list of inclusions / exclusions in terms of the types of book.
  • Palgrave Macmillan: one chapter can be made available after a 36 month embargo for monographs – some types of book are excluded.
  • Routledge / Taylor & Francis: the accepted version of one chapter can be made open access on a repository after an embargo (12mo STEM, 18mo humanities & social sciences).
  • Springer: the official policy is that book chapters cannot be made open access, but we have had success requesting permission for some chapters in Springer series.
  • University of Wales Press: no policy for book chapters found.
  • Wiley-Blackwell: no policy, request via permissions@wiley.com

Smaller publishers may not have a clear policy: it is always worth requesting permission to make the accepted manuscript of a chapter open access, after an embargo if necessary. It may be useful to refer to the examples above of permissions from major publishers.

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Reminder: REF Open Access Policy Change, 1st April 2018

We have already blogged about the announced change to the REF Open Access policy which comes into effect from 1 April 2018: this enforces the strict “three months from date of acceptance” time limit on uploading the full text of a paper into RIS. This applies to papers accepted on or after 1 April 2018.

HEFCE have indicated that we will be audited on the file upload date from RIS and the date of acceptance. The policy also includes an exception that can be used (after 1/4/18) if this date is missed but exceptions are expected to be rare. More information can be found on HEFCE’s website.

This change can potentially have most impact for journals where the delay between acceptance and publication is longest, something we see more frequently in humanities and social science subject areas.

We have always reiterated the key message: Act at Acceptance! And we are here to help: iss-research@swansea.ac.uk

http://www.swansea.ac.uk/library/researchsupport/open-access/ 

OAPiktochart

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Curating Swansea University Theses

A pebble dressed up as a graduate with a scroll.

From October 2017 all new PhD students have to make an electronic copy of their thesis available online. Information about this is available on our LibGuide. Existing and former PhD students can also participate in the new e-thesis service to make our Swansea University theses open access on the institutional repository Cronfa.

We are also awaiting completion of a project to digitize 1000 older theses (see the original news item from June 2017). This work is being undertaken by Proquest and the resulting full text PDFs will be available both on Cronfa and on Proquest’s Dissertations and Theses database.

Swansea University already has over 180 theses that were digitized via part of the Ethos service run by the British Library. This offers digitization of a thesis for a fee and the thesis is then made available for all users on http://ethos.bl.uk/. Our theses that have been digitized in this way are linked from our library catalogue iFind or can be found using the Advanced Search option on Ethos: enter “Swansea” as a term for “Current Institution” and check the box for “Limit search to items available for immediate download”.

The library catalogue iFind remains the main source for all Swansea University theses. The print copies are held in the thesis store and can be consulted in the library (however many of these are away for digitization with Proquest at the moment).

The Library Research Support Team is working closely with our metadata and cataloguing experts to improve access to the university’s theses collection – we will post more information on e-theses over the next few months to support the launch of this new service. Contact us on openaccess@swansea.ac.uk with any queries!

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Filed under Library Resources for Research, Open Access, Theses