Author Archives: drsamoakley

About drsamoakley

Research Librarian at Swansea University

Making a paper open access step-by-step

This post is a walk-through of the process for making a journal article open access on our institutional repository, as required by REF / SU’s open access policy.

If you can pay for “Gold” open access with the publisher (including a CC-BY licence), then your paper will be compliant. You may wish to consider using one of the Springer journals covered by the UK open access agreement with that publisher. This gives free open access publication to SU staff and students in one of the applicable titles. We have funding for open access for UKRI researchers.

Scenario: you have written an article and you want to submit it for publication.

Check that the journal allows you to comply with open access requirements: use Sherpa Romeo. If you have a research funder, check your funder’s policy as it is likely to have more restrictions.

Points to check on Sherpa Romeo are:

  1. If there is an embargo period, is it longer than 12 months (STEM) or 24 months (social science/humanities)? If so, this will not comply with the REF open access policy. You can still submit to the journal but you will need to produce evidence for the REF that you considered other journals and only this one was suitable.
  2. Do they allow you to upload the accepted version (post-print) onto an institutional repository at a minimum? Published version would be even better. If not, you can still submit to the journal but you will need to produce evidence for the REF that you considered other journals and only this one was suitable.

Acceptance: Your paper is peer reviewed, a few changes are requested and then you are contacted to say the paper has been accepted.

  1. Create a record on RIS with the information you have: title, journal, date of acceptance.
  2. Upload the accepted version: this is your final version which includes any changes made following peer review. Convert a Word document to PDF. If you are allowed to make your paper immediately available before publication, use the “Publish to Cronfa” link next to the file in RIS to make it appear the next day.

Your paper is finally published (either online, early, or in an issue of the journal).

  • Once the article is published, use the “Publish to Cronfa” link next to the file in RIS to set your full text file to release to Cronfa either immediately (if there is no embargo) or on a date in the future.

Whenever your paper becomes open access, be sure to promote it with a link to the Cronfa page so that readers can find the full text. You can track views and downloads on Cronfa and there will also be information on altmetrics (social media activity) and citations if these accrue.

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Locating open access papers

Google_Phone

Making a paper open access serves no purpose if that paper is not findable by its potential readers. These may be other academics, students or interested public.

In recent years there’s been an increase in open access discovery tools to help readers quickly locate the full text of an article which is paywalled. Most of these tools have pros and cons; none of them fully index the full spread of legally available open access papers in institutional and subject repositories. Some of these will link with the library’s subscriptions to give access to the full text, as well as any freely available copies on the web. Check our library’s access using iFind’s “Articles & more” search tab (see below).

How can a researcher find full text for a paper they need to read? This quick overview assumes a search for a specific known paper (not a general search on a topic):

  • Google Scholar: this is the academic search engine version of Google. It is excellent for turning up open versions of papers and usually displays a link straight to the paper on the right. However, institutional repositories are not always well indexed by Google Scholar so it can miss free content. You can link Google Scholar to the library’s subscriptions; it also has its own browser button.
  • Unpaywall: an open access discovery service that is being integrated into many databases and sites. You can also use their browser extension to get a colour-coded padlock with (hopefully) direct access to a PDF. Our repository – Cronfa – is not yet indexed by Unpaywall so its coverage is good but not comprehensive. Unpaywall also has the facility to bulk-check a list of DOIs which may be useful.
  • Open Access button: another open access discovery service which also has its own browser extension. Cronfa IS indexed by open access button but, again, its coverage will not be complete.
  • Kopernio: another browser plugin to help find OA content.
  • The university library iFind service does include some open access content but coverage of free material is not as good as some of the above. However, it does provide authoritative access to the university’s subscription content which will give the publisher version of a paper after logging in (IF we have a subscription to that journal).
  • Google is not an academic search engine but many use it for discovery. Open access papers are often indexed by Google and including the search command “filetype:pdf” can help to locate full text. You can also include quotes around the title to make your search more precise.

If you do a lot of literature searching it is definitely worth installing one of the browser extensions to find an open version of a paper but it is also worth remembering that, if one is not available, a focused Google search may still turn up a copy in a repository that has not yet been indexed by these services.

Comments welcomed if you use any of these tools!

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Managing Your Publication Profile: RIS, CRONFA, and Open Access

We are running a staff training session on “Managing Your Publication Profile: RIS, CRONFA, and Open Access”. This is aimed at any staff with publications and is an ideal introduction if you are new to Swansea University’s systems or if you just need an overview of how they all work. Administrators as well as authors are welcome.

You will learn…

  1. How to curate a public research profile on the university website / systems;
  2. How to ensure you comply with open access requirements (university / REF / funder);
  3. How to use an ORCiD to manage your research profile.

The session is on Thursday 13th September 1-2pm in the library on Park Campus. Please sign up via the course catalogue in ABW or just drop us an email if you are unable to access ABW.

If you can’t make the session but need the information, we have a guide for new staff and an open offer to support you with any open access / RIS / Cronfa queries!

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Open Access Essentials

We have a brief guide to the basics of making papers open access to make sure you comply with the university and REF Open Access policies, now available in Welsh and English:

Infographics_Screenshot

Hanfodion Mynediad Agored

Open Access Essentials

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Springer allows self-archiving of book chapters for open access

Book_with_heart_BW

Excellent open access news – Springer now allow self-archiving of book chapters to make them open access via the (free) “green” route. Their updated policy is here: https://www.springer.com/gp/open-access/authors-rights/self-archiving-policy/2124

Any Swansea Uni author who has published a book chapter with Springer can now upload the accepted version of a chapter into RIS and make it open access on Cronfa once the embargo has passed. Embargo length depends on the type of book and is either 12 or 24 months.

Springer were one of the few major publishers who did not allow green open access at all for book chapter so it is good to see a positive change that will encourage more open access book chapters! We have just updated our summary post on making book chapters open access to reflect this change.

Book chapters are not covered by the current REF Open Access policy but our university open access policy states “wherever possible researchers will be expected to make all published research outputs available as Green Open Access”. SU authors are welcome to contact iss-research@swansea.ac.uk for guidance and support with making their work open access on RIS/Cronfa.

 

 

 

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Resources from “Stand out and be counted”

We ran an updated version of our “Stand out and be counted” session for researchers this week. This time we have hosted all the resources on a Padlet:

Made with Padlet

The presentations are at the bottom of each column, apart from “Open Research” which was just an activity we did around a coffee break.

Many thanks to all those who came and participated!

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How to comply with the UKRI (RCUK) open access mandate

Post by Caroline Rauter

Research Council Open Access (OA) block grant 2018-19

Swansea University continues to benefit from the UKRI (formerly RCUK) block grant to pay publisher Article Processing Charges (APCs). The funding, which applies to all published outputs resulting from funding by the Research Councils, has been extended to run until March 2020. We are now in year six of the RCUK Open Access (OA) policy.

Swansea University operates the block grant on a first come, first served approach. 

UKRI (RCUK) OA compliance targets 2018-19

The Research Councils’ OA FAQs stipulate that their preference… “is for unrestricted open access (Gold)”, but they support a mixed approach for going “gold” or using “green” self-archiving in a repository:

  • As an RCUK funded researcher you are obliged to make 100% of your research outputs open access and you should ensure that all relevant acknowledgements are included.
  • Swansea University reported an overall compliance rate of 5% in April 2018 (using both the green and gold routes).

We are required to improve the Swansea University open access compliance rate in 2019.

Licences compliant with the UKRI (RCUK) OA policy

i) Gold route (immediate open access) using a Creative Commons CC-BY licence.

ii) Green route (deposit of the final accepted manuscript in RIS & Cronfa, usually with an embargo)

  • Of note is the requirement that the publisher copyright licence places no restriction on non-commercial reuse, including non-commercial text and data-mining. The licence should allow for the sharing of adaptations of the material. This means a CC-BY-NC-NDlicence is not
  • This brings authors into conflict with the funder policy when publishing using the green route in, for example, an Elsevier hybrid journal. You should apply for financial support using the gold route if this is applicable for your chosen journal.
  • Where publishers offer a gold route, but the researcher chooses green, papers should be published in a journal with a maximum embargo of 6 months for STEM funded disciplines, or 12months in the arts, humanities and social sciences funded research. Research papers in biomedicine should be published with an embargo of no longer than six months.

iii) Open Government Licence (OGL) Crown Body employees only, e.g. Welsh Government.

In support of sustainable and affordable OA options we encourage authors to consider publishing in:

  • Reputable, fully OA journals found in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ).
  • Journals where the publishers are transitioning hybrid (subscription) to OA, for example: American Chemical Society, Cambridge University Press, IEEE, IOP, Oxford University Press, Sage, Springer, Taylor & Francis and Wiley.

We currently have institutional open access discount deals with MDPI, Sage, Springer and Wiley.

Contact us: Openaccess@swansea.ac.uk      T: (0)1792 604567

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