Publish Open Access with IOP Publishing

IOP Publishing (@IOPPublishing) _ TwitterImage credit: @IOPPublishing

IOP Publishing (IOP), Jisc Collections and Swansea University Library Service have come to an agreement which enables researchers to publish their work on an open access basis at no additional cost in the majority of IOP’s hybrid journals. The agreement balances the cost of hybrid article publication charges (APCs) against journal license fees for 2020 onwards.

All corresponding (submitting) authors can publish in eligible journals open access without barriers, without additional cost, and be certain that they comply to any open access requirement. Eligible hybrid titles are available from this list.

Research articles and reviews (letters, papers, reviews and special issue articles) accepted for publication after 1 Jan 2020 are eligible, IOP will automatically identify qualifying articles and inform authors of their inclusion.

Included in the agreement are all subscription journals, owned by IOP Publishing, which offer a hybrid open access option. In addition, the agreement also includes selected journals which are published by IOP Publishing on behalf of our society partners.

How to take advantage of the agreement

1. Identify yourself clearly in the article submission form and the article itself
2. Use a Swansea University email address
3. Follow the IOP submission instructions 

Articles are published with a Creative Commons CC-BY licence at no cost to you.

Discounted APCs

Corresponding (submitting) authors at subscribing institutions can also benefit from a 70% discount on the standard APC of hybrid journals not included in the above list that are published with some of our partner societies. Please visit IOP for further details. This discount is not available for any journal that is funded by page charges or submissions fees.

Open Access Publishing with Wiley

                               

Publish Your Open Access Research Articles with Wiley
From March 2020 Swansea University is a participating UK institution in partnership with Wiley and the JISC Open Access Agreement for Institutions. This researcher support is provided by the Swansea University Library Service.

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Image: WOCinTech Chat (CC-BY-2.0)

Author’s may publish articles in any of Wiley’s fully Gold Open Access, or OnlineOpen hybrid (subscription) journals with no open access costs to the author*. A list of Wiley’s Open Access and hybrid subscription journals is available from the Open Access Author Dashboard together with access to an Author Compliance Tool so you can check if you meet your funder obligations.

To publish without having to pay additional Article Publication Charges (APCs), the corresponding author must be from a participating UK institution and the article must have been accepted on or after 2 March 2020.

Eligibility criteria:

  • Your manuscript must have been accepted on or after 2 March 2020
  • You must be the corresponding author who is affiliated with a participating UK institution at the point of acceptance
  • You must publish open access in a fully gold OA journal or a hybrid (subscription) journal that offers OnlineOpen
  • If publishing in a hybrid (subscription) journal, you must order OnlineOpen at the point of acceptance by using the Wiley Author Services workflow 
  • As the Wiley Open Access Account holder, the Library Research Support team will authorise your request provided you meet the eligibility criteria. Please use a Swansea University email address to help us authenticate your application. We will contact you directly if we need additional information before approving your request
  • This agreement cannot be used to cover additional charges (e.g. cover, color, and page charges), which individual journals administer separately
  • Please ensure that you acknowledge your funder and provide details for any supporting data in the published article. This is a requirement for research articles supported by many funders, including UKRI

Quick Links:
How to Order Online Open
Author Compliance Tool

*subject to availability of sufficient funds and approval from eligible institutions’ Wiley Open Access Account holders.

You can find further details on our Open Access Library Guide.

#WFH – Library Research Support Team

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The Library Research Support Team (Anna, Ellie and Caroline) are working remotely and are still available to support Swansea University researchers with queries about Research Outputs in RIS & Cronfa, Open Access, Publishing, Copyright, Open Research, Research Impact, E-Thesis Deposit, Post-graduate training etc.

You can get in touch during normal office hours via ISS-Research@swansea.ac.uk, see our resources via the webpages www.swansea.ac.uk/library/researchsupport/, or follow our Twitter feed @SULibResSupport

If you would like to talk directly, then we can use Zoom or TEAMS. Please contact us to arrange a suitable time for an online meeting.

Meanwhile in other news

Our open access APC online form is currenly closed but should be back up and running after April 1st when we expect new funds to support requests for financial support for UKRI supported research.

The recent update to the Research Information System (RIS) still figures quite prominently in our workflow and we are working closely with the developers as tweaks and final development moves towards a close at the end of March. If you want to report issues you can still use the ‘Feedback’ tab on the RIS screen.

We have a couple of new(ish) Research Publishing webpages called ‘Steps to Open Research’ and ‘Do you want to publish an Open Access journal? Publish with us‘. If you would like to discuss the options around your academic journal proposal, fill out a form and one of the Digital Humanities Team will get in touch. They are also there to support researchers with data management enquiries via research-data@swansea.ac.uk
We are also working on a ‘Handbook for Open Research’, so watch this space.

If you or any colleagues need copyright support as you develop your new Canvas VLE modules or move teaching content online – get in touch.

Do you want to publish an Open Access journal? Publish with us!

We are an institutional online publisher of Open Access electronic journals. Our catalogue of titles allow readers to access and use the content free of charge under a Creative Commons licence.

We are growing this service and welcome enquiries from Swansea University researchers considering starting an academic journal. We do not charge the editors of journals for publishing with us on the Open Journal Systems platform (OJS). Editors wishing to transfer established journal titles to Swansea University are welcome to apply.

If you would like to find out more why don’t you come along to the next Academic Publishing Coffee Morning?

At this event, you can:

  • Speak to experienced academics and professional services staff who already publish journals
  • See what is really involved in editing and publishing academic publications
  • Learn about OJS, the journal publishing platform supported by Swansea’s Digital Humanities team
  • Find out what support we can offer you to set up your own peer-reviewed academic journal as part of Swansea’s digital press

Wednesday February 12th, 11:00 – 13:00 – Nanhyfer Workzone Sem Rm 01 on the Bay Campus

Contact: digitalhumanities@swansea.ac.uk for further information.

Swansea University Digital Press – Open Access Journal Proposal
You can provide information about your prospective publication by completing the online form.

The Game of Open Access – Training in 2020

What is it?

The Game of Open Access is a board game developed by staff at the University of Huddersfield. The aim is to engage researchers with the key concepts and tools required to meet Open Access mandates. Through the use of playful learning, it aims to develop an understanding of the role of Open Access through the initial idea for an article to its acceptance for publication.

In essence, you play as a researcher making your way through the research process landing on square where you pick up a card with a question about Open Access at Swansea University, then discuss and answer the questions to make your way around the board.

The Game is ‘customizable’, so if there are specific questions relevant for your department, we can include them.

Why should you take part?

The Game of Open Access is a fun way of getting to grips with points of confusion around open access (the difference between Green and Gold for example, or which type of manuscript to upload to RIS), in contrast to sitting listening to me talk for an hour. Also there are sweets.

Who is it for?

The game is relevant to researchers at any stage of their career, whether it’s your first introduction to open access or you need a refresh on Swansea’s specific policy. It can also be useful for professional services staff who support researchers. We have previously run the session in the College of Engineering, and the main feedback was not enough questions!

Interested? Get in touch with us to arrange a session in your college by emailing Ellie Downes, Research Librarian at e.c.downes@swansea.ac.uk

Publish Your Own Open Access Journal Drop-In Event

Are you thinking about starting a new open access journal, perhaps in an emerging field of research? Swansea University supports the open source software Open Journal Systems (OJS)

OJS Logo

Come and meet us for coffee and a chat
Wednesday December 4th  2019, 10 am – 12 noon
Taliesin Mall Room, Singleton Park Campus

  • Learn about OJS, the journal publishing platform supported by Swansea’s Digital Humanities team
  • See what is involved in editing and publishing an open access academic journal
  • Speak to experienced academics and professional services staff who already publish journals
  • Find out about the support on offer to help set up your own peer-reviewed academic journal as part of Swansea’s digital press
  • You can get customized support from the university for the installation and implementation of this software, including the server space, at no cost
Digital Humanities Lab
Library Research Support

The myths surrounding open scholarly publishing

We were interested to spot this new preprint by Professor Tom Crick et al, discussing the ten myths around Open Scholarship publishing. The paper, which is open for comment, delves into the evolving framework and core issues surrounding Open Research, Open Science and Open Scholarship.

TenMyths.Crick.CC-BY (3)

Whilst it is hard to pick out a ‘favourite’ myth, there are some particularly cogent points highlighted in Myth 6, Copyright Transfer, which deserve wider discussion and dissemination amongst academics. With Plan S hovering into view with the requirement that authors and universities retain copyright in their scientific research articles rather than transfer it to publishers, this topic needs much wider visibility.

If you want to explore the debate you can read the full text of the article here: https://peerj.com/preprints/27580/

PeerJ Preprints | https://doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.27580v1| CC BY 4.0 Open Access|

 

Predatory publishers

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We have blogged before about predatory publishers but a training session today suggested some tips people might find useful:

  • Some journals lie about an impact factor. If you are in doubt about a journal go to http://wok.mimas.ac.uk then click the purple login button. You will find Journal Citation Reports right at the top of the screen and can check any claims.
  • Be suspicious of any journal which claims to publish very quickly with peer review – this usually takes time.
  • Where you can, check out journal editors. In a good journal they should be someone with a track record in the field.
  • Suncat is a union catalogue showing the journal holdings of many UK academic libraries. If a journal is not held by any library, or perhaps only one, it may be suspect. However, you do need to bear in mind that there may be genuine new journals which don’t appear yet.
  • DOAJ, the Directory of Open Access Journals, carries out some quality checks on the journals it lists.

It is also worth being aware that some conferences are run purely to make money without giving any value. Think Check Attend gives some things to think about if you are considering a new conference.

International Journal of Population Data Science (IJPDS)

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On Monday 12th November 2018, IJPDS is changing the publishing licence from the current Creative Commons
CC-BY-ND to 
CC-BY

 

 

The International Journal of Population Data Science (IJPDS) is an electronic, open-access, peer-reviewed journal focussing on the science pertaining to population data. It publishes articles on all aspects of research, development and evaluation connected with data about people and populations.

It is published by Swansea University.

Why is IJPDS changing to CC-BY?
At IJPDS, sharing research freely is at the heart of everything we do and, as an Open Access journal, it is important that we uphold the Open Access ethos of making research freely accessible to all without restriction.

We currently publish articles under the CC-BY-ND licence, but this restricts the freedom to make changes and to distribute derivatives, thereby blocking or restricting the creation of derivative works. Our decision to migrate to the CC-BY licence will allow others more freedom to engage with IJPDS author’s research whilst still protecting the author’s moral rights.

  • the freedom to use published research and associated benefits of using it
  • the freedom to study manuscripts and to apply knowledge acquired from them
  • the freedom to make and redistribute copies of the information
  • the freedom to make changes and improvements, and to distribute derivative works

Funder Requirements
Increasing numbers of research funders stipulate the use of CC-BY when publishing via Open Access. Subsequently, IJPDS already offers the CC-BY licence to authors funded by RCUK / Wellcome Trust. We also use the CC0 “No rights reserved” licence for publishing source data that permits its re-use. IJPDS is now simply extending the right to freely access and use published research by rolling CC-BY out to cover all published works.

Benefits of CC-BY
By removing the restriction on derivative works, CC-BY opens up more options for using the research e.g. new ways of representing scholarly articles through text-mining and visualization techniques or allowing articles to be translated into other languages, and encouraging engagement with manuscripts through wider use has clear benefits to the authors.

Protecting Authors
Publishing under a free license does not mean that authors lose all their rights and any use of manuscripts published in IJPDS still require full attribution (i.e. giving credit and recognition to the author of a manuscript). Creative Commons licences require that no modifications to manuscripts should ‘be prejudicial to the Original Author’s honor or reputation’ (http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions).

Please note that manuscripts already published IJPDS prior to Monday 12th November 2019 will remain as CC-BY-ND, unless we receive a request from the authors to change to CC-BY.

Guest post by Sharon Hindley, IJPDS Marketing Manager.
Tweet to @IJPDS

Don’t fall victim to predatory publishers

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Have you received emails asking you to submit a paper to a journal or conference? Researchers are increasingly being bombarded by unsolicited solicitations to publish and these should be treated with extreme caution.

The model of authors paying to publish open access has had the undesirable side-effect of spawning an industry of low quality, sometimes fraudulent, publishers and copy-cat journals to try and get authors to part with money to get published. Emails may reference your previous research or conference presentations; the journal may be a close imitation of a well-reputed one in your field. The pressure on academics to publish means that some of these emails will succeed – unfortunately, it is not just the loss of money that is at stake but also reputation:

One dodgy publication in your publication list brings all the others into question. If you are attaching that publication list to a research grant application, it works against the whole submission. (“Are my publications any good?“, The Research Whisperer blog, 22 Mar 2016)
You may already be wise to this but please don’t assume your colleagues or PhD students are – help us spread the word that this is happening and that there are resources available to help evaluate where to publish.

We have already blogged on some places where you can explore legitimate places to publish. The Think, Check, Submit website also offers good advice on approaching the question of where to publish. Their video is below:

Think. Check. Submit. from Think. Check. Submit. on Vimeo.