Postgrad Research student essentials

Graduates_on_Hill

Welcome to all our new PGR students!

Bookings have opened for the excellent new programme of Postgraduate Skills sessions. As always the library is contributing a wide selection of sessions but in particular we’d encourage Postgraduate Researchers to sign up promptly for:

  1. An informal library tour/induction: the best way to get the most out of the library as a building and all the expert staff here to help you.
  2. E-Thesis training: from October, new students will be part of the new electronic thesis submission process to maximize the impact of your research. Find out what you need to know at the start and be prepared!

Sessions are running across both campuses. Please share with any students in your department! Book on here.

We’d also recommend every PGR student get in touch with their library subject team to take advantage of all the support on offer. Contact details here.

 

 

 

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Welcome to all our new researchers!

Welcome_Flickr_

Photo Credit: Charles Henry (assets) Flickr via Compfight cc

With the start of another academic year, we welcome all researchers! The Library Research Support Team works alongside the library subject teams, providing specialist support around topics related to research publications & scholarly communications:

  • Open Access publication, including compliance with the REF & University open access policies + administering our RCUK fund for gold open access
  • Using the Research Information System (RIS) and Cronfa, our institutional repository
  • Metrics & altmetrics, including use of SciVal
  • Researcher profiles (inc ORCiD)
  • Copyright
  • E-Theses & training for Postgraduate Research Students

There is more information on all the above our website and on this blog. In particular, we have guidance for new staff on managing publications in Swansea University’s systems (PDF, & Welsh version) plus detailed advice on how to comply with the Open Access policy.

Please do get in touch with us with any questions on the above or to request one-to-one support! We meet with staff regularly across campus or in sessions organised by Colleges/Departments/Research Groups. We also tweet as @sulibressupport and run training sessions as part of the Staff Development programme.

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Creative Commons

Creative Commons

You may have been asked to put a creative commons license on your work. What is this and what does it do?

Creative Commons is a global non profit organization that enables sharing through the use of free legal tools. The licenses work with copyright law and give permissions to share, alter, etc. without anyone needing to contact you.

The licenses are:

CC-BY – lets others use, tweak and distribute your work as long as they give you credit. This is the most liberal license and the one favoured by RCUK who insist on it if they pay for your open access article.

CC-BY-SA – share alike – this lets others use, change and distribute your work as long as they credit you and also share anything they create from your work under the same license.

CC-BY-ND – no derivatives -people are free to use and share but cannot change anything.

CC-BY-NC-SA – non commercial share alike – allows people to use and alter your work as long as it is not commercial and they share it under the same licence.

CC-BY-NC-ND – allows others to download and share your work but they cannot change or share it commercially.

The creative commons site has a tool to help you choose the best for you https://creativecommons.org/choose/

Ideally creative commons would like to encourage people to share with as few restrictions as possible.

If you use their license tool it will give you a symbol to use on your work but also some code. If you are able to use this in your work it will mean that Google, YouTube etc. can identify it as having a licence and it will appear more in search results.

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Exporting publications from RIS to another system

If you want to set up a new research profile (such as an ORCiD) then a new feature on Cronfa can help! Research staff at Swansea University are required to enter all their publications onto our Research Information System (RIS). This then feeds them out to their staff web page, our institutional repository Cronfa and other processes such as REF. You can get publications into RIS directly from ORCiD but until recently there has been no easy way to get publications out of RIS into another system.

RIS feeds publications into Cronfa: a recent enhancement to Cronfa means that researchers can now export their publications from there BUT this will only capture outputs in RIS which have the “Public” flag ticked so that they appear on Cronfa (you will see a red Cross next to your output in RIS if it is not currently public).

In Cronfa, navigate to your author page: you can do this by searching for one of your outputs and then clicking on the “Swansea University author” name (highlighted in yellow below):

Cronfa_Author_Link

An author page looks like this:

Cronfa_Author_Export

At the top (highlighted yellow in the screenshot) there is an “Export all as” option. You can choose either EndNote or BibTex. If you select “BibTex”, you can manually edit the file name and add a “.bib” extension.

BibTex is used, for example, by ORCiD as one of their import options so this provides a quick route to populate your ORCiD profile with all your publications, particularly if you have publications which are not indexed in major databases such as Scopus.

If you wish to export a selection of outputs from Cronfa, you can use the “Bookbag” functionality. On any search results page you can select specific outputs and use the “Add to Bookbag”. The suitcase item at the top of the screen lets you view your “Bookbag” and there is an export option there for Refworks, EndNote and BibTex.

 

 

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Scopus citations now in Cronfa

Our research repository Cronfa now displays a citation count from Scopus if the data is available. Citation data will appear if:

  • The output has a DOI
  • The citation count is greater than zero

An example can be seen here (highlighted yellow):

Cronfa_Scopus_Data

Click the image to view the record in Cronfa

Clicking on the “Scopus” link should take you direct to the citing publications on Scopus but if you are off campus the login process can disrupt this. If you login, then try again – you should get through.

Scopus is the source of citation data for the world rankings (QS and THE) and for some REF Units of Assessment.

 

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See your article’s altmetrics in Cronfa

Swansea University’s public repository Cronfa has recently had a few enhancements. One of them is the addition of the Altmetric “donut” (or “bagel”, if you prefer). We have blogged about altmetrics before: the system counts mentions of a research paper across a wide range of media, social media, policy documents and more.

The donut will only appear on records that have some altmetric activity AND have a DOI or identifier that can be used to collate this activity (see “How it works” on the altmetric blog for more information). This is how it looks on Cronfa:

 

Screenshot of Cronfa article showing the colourful altmetric donut below the QR code

 

When you see the altmetric donut, the number in the middle is the altmetric “attention score” but you can click on it to explore the individual mentions that they have tracked. More information on what is counted on the Altmetric website.

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Are you funded by RCUK? Please note some changes to their open access policy

RCUK

 

 

In 2017/18 RCUK expects institutions to make 75% of their RCUK funded research open access. This is a high target so please make sure you make your work open access if they provide your funding.

RCUK have clarified the licences allowed on green open access articles for the research they fund (6.2 on their FAQ list). These are articles made freely available in an institutional repository. Articles should place no restriction on non-commercial reuse (including text and data mining) and should allow adaptations of the material to be shared. This means that a CC-BY-NC licence is acceptable but a CC-BY-NC-ND licence is not.  There is more detail on these licences on the creative commons web site.

Elsevier currently insist on a CC-BY-NC-ND licence for green open access which does not fit RCUK requirements so if you are publishing with them it would be best to apply for funding for gold open access. You can do this  using the online form on our APC page  when you have an article accepted. The Sherpa FACT tool allows you to check that journals from other publishers meet RCUK requirements.

If an author chooses the green route the embargo period should be a maximum of 6 months for STEM subjects and 12 months for arts, humanities and social sciences. This is a shorter time period than that allowed for the REF (2.1 on FAQ list). However, a longer period is allowed if there is no money for gold open access.

Innovate UK and the UK space agency are not part of RCUK so research funded by them cannot be paid for using the block grant – some people have been unsure about this.

If you are bewildered by the different licences and requirements please be assured that you will not be alone in this! Contact the Library research support team for advice about your own publications iss-research@swansea.ac.uk

 

 

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