Proquest Dissertations and Theses

This database to which we subscribe has recently increased massively the number of links to the full text of PhD theses.   Most theses submitted since 1997 in this database can now be viewed in pdf format, together with some older theses.

Proquest Dissertations and Theses Global provides details of theses submitted in Britain and Ireland between 1716 and the present and in the United States since 1861.  It also has records of many theses from elsewhere in the world.     It’s an excellent database for finding details of PhD theses on a topic.

You can get a link to Proquest Dissertations and Theses by doing a search in  iFind.   There are also links to the database in our  Library Guides.

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InCites

InCites™5

You may have come across Scival, Elsevier’s citation analysis tool which we have access to at the university. InCites is a rival product based on Web of Science data which allows similar analysis.

  • Access Incites at http://wok.mimas.ac.uk then click the InCites link at the very top of the screen.
  • You will need to create your own username and password which can then be used on or off campus.
  • The built in InCites System reports are the easiest place to start. If you have an ORCID or researcher ID use the researcher report to get a picture of how often you have been cited, which journals have given you the most citations and which area of your work has the highest impact. The other three reports look at the institution – how it’s research performs in terms of citations, which journals it publishes in and which organizations it collaborates with.
  • For more in depth analysis you can filter people, organizations, regions etc. to get the data you want.
  • More detail about the indicators used in InCites is in the indicators handbook.
  • Recorded training on different aspects of InCites can be found at http://wokinfo.com/training_support/training/incites/

Let us know if you discover any interesting snippets about university research!

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Twitter for researchers

birds

Our “7 Days of Twitter” course was “aimed at Swansea University researchers, staff and students who wish to learn more about Twitter in the context of research and boosting your research impact”. We have no plans at present to re-run the course but all the material is freely available to work through at any time (and if you tweet us – @rscsam or @benfelen – we’d still be delighted to hear from you!). A reminder of what the course covered:

All the resources are derived from the original course by Dr Helen Webster and are similarly licensed for re-use under a  Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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Promoting your publications with Kudos

If you are looking for ways to promote your research, the web service Kudos is a free option to try: https://www.growkudos.com/. See an example of Kudos for an article  or another example by Swansea University’s Louise Miskell.

Here’s a short video which explains what Kudos offers:

In a nutshell the advantages of Kudos are:

  • Explain” = a user-friendly page to contextualize and promote an article or book, re-wording its content in a more accessible format (“What it’s about”, “Why it’s important”) and linking to any additional resources (blog posts, videos etc.) = “Enrich“.  For example, if an article is available open access on Cronfa then that could be an additional link to include.
  • Share” this page with your networks, via email or on a website/blog. This step is critical: you will need to get the page out to the world in order to reap the benefits!
  • Use Kudos to “measure” activity around the publication: see this video for further details on what stats Kudos can provide.

The value of Kudos relies on the researcher taking the time to enrich a Kudos page for a publication and then promote the resulting page to an existing network. It could be a useful tool for promoting papers for maximum impact – the ability to provide a layperson’s version is particularly useful. Opinions welcome in the comments!

 

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Keep up to date with Browzine

Browzine

Browzine allows you to browse many of the journals subscribed to by Swansea University in one single easy platform. You can access it online at http://browzine.com/libraries/242/subjects or you can download an app to use it on your mobile device.

When you go into Browzine you can choose to search for a journal or browse titles for your subject. If you sign up for an account you can set up bookshelves of the journals you want to keep up with so that you can access them quickly. This will sync across your mobile devices as well so could be useful for reading on the train! You will receive an email when new content is added to your chosen journals.

When browsing a title you can expand an article to see the options below. You should be able to click through to full text for most titles if you find an article you are interested in.

Browzine image

You can bookmark articles you have found useful which you will be able to access through My Articles or export citations to reference managers like EndNote and Mendeley.

Browzine isn’t the best tool for searching for articles on a particular subject but it is a handy way to keep up with the latest articles. Give it a try and see if it works for you.

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Bring a Zombie ORCID back to life

zombie-521243_1280

With rumours of the researcher identifier ORCID being mandatory for the next REF, I came across the concept of the “Zombie ORCID” on this blog post (recounting an ORCID workshop run by the OU):

“Most people who had encountered ORCID had been prompted to add an ORCID by publisher or funder submission systems.  So people had created ORCIDs in order to complete the submission of an article or a bid… and probably hadn’t done anything with their ORCID account afterwards.  So what’s the wider impact of this – researchers signing up for ORCIDs to comply with funder publisher requirements but not really knowing what it’s for, or what to do with it?  Zombie accounts we called them… and that’s a problem.”

If you have created an ORCID for an administrative reason in the past and then not done anything further with it, take a few moments to bring it back to life!

  1. Check your details are up to date by signing in and tweaking your account details if necessary: if you need to alter your email, it’s a simple process requiring verification.
  2. It’s very easy to add your publication history to your ORCID and give it real value: ORCID has a variety of ways to get your papers in automatically without typing: it connects directly with the following bibliometric sources:
    • CrossRef: this will draw on a vast amount of publication metadata. Tip: put a “+” in front of each word to get results that include both names e.g. +Samantha +Oakley This is a particularly useful option for Humanities or Social Science areas where coverage in the other databases may not be so good, particularly for book chapters. You can even sign up for CrossRef to auto-update your ORCID profile with new publications, ensuring it never becomes a zombie again.
    • Scopus: the massive Elsevier database has a profile for each author on a paper it has indexed. You may wish to also check your Scopus profile is correct too, showing all your publications.
    • Web of Science (Researcher ID): the rival Thomson Reuter database also has its own identifier and database. It may give slightly different results to Scopus but the two are likely to be similar.
    • European PubMed Central: useful for those in health-related areas.
    • If you have your papers in a reference management tool like EndNote or Mendeley, ORCID provides an import and export of “Bibtex” formatted files of references. Just look for the option to export your papers from within EndNote or Mendeley.
  3. Add your ORCID to your HR information on Swansea University’s Agresso Business World HR system : it will then appear on your staff web page and in RIS (you can pull your outputs into RIS from ORCID). See our post on using your ORCID in SU systems for more information.
  4. Above all else, use your ORCID on any funding applications or publications: the more you use it, the more future work can be attributed to the authoritative record of your academic profile. This not only avoids your work being wrongly attributed to others of the same or similar name, but also means you have a neat online profile and single point of reference for all your achievements.

As more and more places require researchers to have an ORCID, it’s important to make sure yours is a true reflection of your work and not an empty page!

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Open Access: new guide for SU researchers

We have a new open access summary for Swansea University researchers with the absolute basics on how to meet your open access obligations. View it online here or click on the image below if you need a bigger version:

suoaessentialspiktochart

This covers the basics of what researchers need to do – if you want more information or to read the various policies in detail, visit our open access support pages. Or contact us and we’d be glad to advise: iss-research@Swansea.ac.uk

 

 

 

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