Web of Science developments

Those of you who use  Web of Science for your research may be interested in the following developments:

  • There will be changes in the way open access is flagged up to distinguish gold final versions from green ones. Also they will be marking hybrid open access papers as open access which has not been possible before.
  • Web of Science are working in partnership with Impact Story and have bought Publons which allows peer reviewers to get credit for their work.
  • Emerging Sources Index – this indexes journals which do not yet meet all the Web of Science standards but are still peer reviewed and meet certain standards. It is included in the core package from 2015 onwards. You will search it as part of the Web of Science core collection but it can be filtered out using the Web of Science Index filter at the left of the screen.
  • The citation report has been redesigned to have a clearer graphic.  WOS graphic
  • There is now a chrome extension which will allow you to jump from a word in chrome to do a search in Web of Science.
  • The marked list has been expanded to hold up to 50,000 records.
  • Accessibility has been assessed and there are some features, such as fixed menus rather than drop downs which are designed to improve the user experience.
  • Web of Science will start indexing early access articles provided they are peer reviewed and accepted so that information is available earlier. They will be labelled early access until the full article appears. Initially these articles will not be taken into account for Journal Citation Reports though this will be considered after 2018.
  • There is now a company library guide for Web of Science with tutorials, guides, etc.

 

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Responsible metrics & UK HE

HEFCE’s “Forum for the Responsible Use of Metrics” currently have open a survey for institutions (one response per institution is required) to find out how institutions are implementing policies on the responsible use of metrics:

Responses will be used in order to develop advice to the sector on practical ways to implement the culture of responsible research metrics using the principles/frameworks outlined above. It will also inform any recommendations the Forum makes to UKRI. Based on the responses received the Forum will consider whether to develop an agreement with similar ambitions to DORA, utilising The Metric Tide report, which aligns with the UK research base.

The Metric Tide report came out in 2015 and included recommendations for institutions (p.12ff). Some institutions have developed policies on responsible metrics – a list can be found at the top of this page on the Bibliomagician blog. Lizzie Gadd also published this article on the same blog which reports on her annual surveys of the bibliometrics community. It will be interesting to see if the HEFCE survey shows similar results.

Institutions are assessed partially on metrics for the world rankings and for some areas of the REF. Metrics can also be used for funding decisions, promotion, job applications, decisions on where to publish (e.g. using the Journal Impact Factor or other rankings of journals). This is more common in some subject areas and countries than others. If you want to learn more about responsible metrics, the Leiden Manifesto video is a good introduction to the issues:

The Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics from Diana Hicks on Vimeo.

 

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Open Access & the REF: an update

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HEFCE announced further clarification on the rules for REF2021 yesterday (PDF here) and this included some decisions on outputs and open access (on p.8). Key points are:

  • The policy is felt to be working in that more papers than ever before have been made open access.
  • The original policy stands with respect to the timeframe for researchers to act: papers must be uploaded to RIS within 3 months of acceptance.
  • However, there will be an exception to cover papers that miss this deadline but are uploaded within 3 months of publication.

The rules around this crucial timing issue have varied during the REF period so a summary is given below:

Papers accepted for publication before 1 April 2016 do not need to comply with the REF open access policy in order to be submitted to the REF (however they are encouraged to be made open access).

Papers accepted for publication between 1 April 2016 and 1 April 2018 need to comply with the REF Open Access policy to be submitted: for this period, the full text of the article needed to be uploaded into RIS within 3 months of the date of online publication (unless the paper was published with Gold Open Access on the publisher site or one of the other exceptions can be applied). Papers that were not uploaded to RIS within 3 months of publication (or which failed to meet other conditions of the policy e.g. minimum embargo period) cannot be submitted to the REF.

Paper accepted for publication after 1 April 2018 will need to comply with the REF Open Access policy to be submitted: the full text of the paper must be uploaded into RIS within 3 months of acceptance for publication (unless the paper was published with Gold Open Access on the publisher site or one of the other exceptions can be applied). It will be possible to claim an exception for papers that miss this deadline but which are uploaded within 3 months of publication. Papers that are not uploaded to RIS within 3 months of publication (or which fail to meet other conditions of the policy e.g. minimum embargo period) cannot be submitted to the REF.

The Library Research Support team checks for REF compliance and reports on this to Research Directors & REF staff. We are currently seeing around 85-90% of papers complying with the REF Open Access policy. We will be doing further publicity in 2018 to ensure all researchers are aware of what they need to do and know that we will be glad to help with any questions: iss-research@swansea.ac.uk.

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Open access and the Bloodhound SSC

Many of you will have heard of Bloodhound SSC, a car built to break the landspeed record but also with the aim of interesting young people in STEM subjects.

218px-Bloodhound_SSC_(19)

By Katie Chan – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0,
https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=47617502

This open access week you may be interested to learn that research carried out at Swansea towards this project is openly available in our repository, Cronfa.

Make sure your work is part of Swansea University history by putting it in Cronfa. Contact iss-research@swansea.ac.uk if you need help.

Bloodhound related articles

Aerodynamic optimisation of the rear wheel fairing of the land speed record vehicle BLOODHOUND SSC / J. Townsend; B. Evans; T. Tudor
Aeronautical Journal, Volume: 120, Issue: 1228, Pages: 930 – 955

https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa31365

Solid particle erosion protection for the BLOODHOUND SSC front wheel arches / C. J. Hannon; B. J. Evans
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part L: Journal of Materials: Design and Applications  

https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa28394

Enhanced flow visualisation of complex aerodynamic phenomena using automatic stream surface seeding with application to the BLOODHOUND SSC Land Speed Record vehicle / M. Edmunds; B. Evans; I. Masters; R. S. Laramee
The Aeronautical Journal, Volume: 120, Issue: 1226, Pages: 547 – 571

https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa28395

Spray drag effect of fluidized sand for a supersonic vehicle /Lakhdar Remaki; Oubay Hassan; Ben J. Evans; Kenneth Morgan
Journal of Coupled Systems and Multiscale Dynamics, Volume: 2, Issue: 3, Pages: 169 – 177

https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa21090

Simulating the aerodynamic characteristics of the Land Speed Record vehicle BLOODHOUND SSC / B. Evans; C. Rose
Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part D: Journal of Automobile Engineering

https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa18080

Design optimisation using computational fluid dynamics applied to a land–based supersonic vehicle, the BLOODHOUND SSC / B Evans; T Morton; L Sheridan; O Hassan;K Morgan; J. W Jones; M Chapman; R Ayers; I Niven
Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization, Volume: 47, Issue: 2, Pages: 301 – 316

https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa12231

Computational fluid dynamics applied to the aerodynamic design of a land-based supersonic vehicle / B.J Evans; O Hassan; J.W Jones; K Morgan; L Remaki
Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations, Volume: 27, Issue: 1, Pages: 141 – 159

https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa6255

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Celebrating Open Access Week 2017

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Open Access Week 2017 runs from 23-29th October. Swansea University is taking the opportunity to celebrate the excellent work being done by all our researchers to make ever-increasing numbers of publications open access, free for the world to download on our repository, Cronfa. We currently have over 3,500 papers available, many of which have been released from behind publisher paywalls so that there is free global access to our excellent research.

Open Access does not come without a cost: it may not be paying article processing charges, but a cost in time for researchers to complete green open access procedures. Open Access Week this year is a reminder of the benefits that open access brings and why the effort is worth it: “Open in order to…”

  • Increase access to knowledge
  • Facilitate collaboration
  • Raise your research visibility
  • Improve public health

The benefits of open access have been demonstrated in many studies and this article from 2016 gives an excellent overview of the benefits of open research more generally.

Swansea University currently publishes several of its own open access journals. Most recently we launched the International Journal of Population Data Science ; we also have the Journal of Neo-Victorian Studies and some excellent student journals (e.g. Gorffennol, Populo) from the College of Arts & Humanities. We also see the launch this year of our open access e-theses service, allowing Swansea University postgraduate researchers to promote their research on a global platform.

The Library Research Support team are happy to advise on any issues or questions around open access, and we also have a Research Data service to support activities around open data.

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Need help with RIS/Cronfa/Open Access?

We have a session for staff on Wednesday 18th October 2-3pm in Training Room 1 in the library on Singleton Park campus:

“Managing your publication profile: RIS, Cronfa & Open Access

Course Description/Overview:

All research staff are required to enter details of their publications onto RIS and comply with the university’s open access policy by uploading their papers to RIS to become public on Cronfa, our institutional repository. This also meets the HEFCE REF Open Access policy requirements. This session will give an overview of how the systems work and how to make your papers open access whilst complying with publisher copyright.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Use RIS to add details of your publications
  • Use RIS to make publications open access (and check copyright compliance)
  • Comply with the HEFCE REF open access policy”

You can book on via ABW course catalogue using code 342 or just come along if  you can’t access that! Training Room 1 is one floor down in the library on Level 2 West: staff at the customer service desk will be happy to direct you.

If you can’t make this session but would like an overview, get in touch with us iss-research@swansea.ac.uk and we’d be glad to arrange something!

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5 Quick Ways to populate your ORCiD

ORCID_AddWorksSwansea University researchers are being encouraged to sign up for an ORCiD (the unique researcher identifier) and add it to our system so it appears on their staff web page and in RIS. There are 3 quick ways to add your publications to the “Works” section of an ORCiD:

1. CrossRef: in ORCiD, you can select “Add Works”, “Search & Link”, then “CrossRef Metadata Search”: you should find CrossRef has a substantial number of your publications, including books and chapters (even for humanities). You can go down the list and select “Add to ORCiD”. However, you have to do this one-by-one.

2. Scopus: again, using “Add Works”, “Search & Link”, then “Scopus to ORCiD” you can pull publications into ORCiD from the massive Elsevier Scopus database. Scopus has good coverage for STEM areas. Humanities, Social Science & book data is increasing but likely to be incomplete. Using this option also forces you to review your Scopus profile (useful for citation metrics).

3. BibTex import: if all your publications are on RIS there is a way to export them from Cronfa to ORCiD. We have already blogged about this – it involves downloading a file from Cronfa, then uploading to ORCiD. The metadata would need reviewing and tidying, if necessary.

4. “Europe PubMed Central” another “Search&Link” option within ORCiD which may be useful to health researchers.

If you’re lucky enough you may also have the bonus option to:

5. Get someone to do it for you: ORCiD allows you to set up a “Trusted Individual” (under Account Settings). That person has to be an ORCiD user (so they need to sign up first), then you can give them access to manage your account without divulging your password.

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