International Journal of Population Data Science (IJPDS)

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On Monday 12th November 2018, IJPDS is changing the publishing licence from the current Creative Commons
CC-BY-ND to 
CC-BY

 

 

The International Journal of Population Data Science (IJPDS) is an electronic, open-access, peer-reviewed journal focussing on the science pertaining to population data. It publishes articles on all aspects of research, development and evaluation connected with data about people and populations.

It is published by Swansea University.

Why is IJPDS changing to CC-BY?
At IJPDS, sharing research freely is at the heart of everything we do and, as an Open Access journal, it is important that we uphold the Open Access ethos of making research freely accessible to all without restriction.

We currently publish articles under the CC-BY-ND licence, but this restricts the freedom to make changes and to distribute derivatives, thereby blocking or restricting the creation of derivative works. Our decision to migrate to the CC-BY licence will allow others more freedom to engage with IJPDS author’s research whilst still protecting the author’s moral rights.

  • the freedom to use published research and associated benefits of using it
  • the freedom to study manuscripts and to apply knowledge acquired from them
  • the freedom to make and redistribute copies of the information
  • the freedom to make changes and improvements, and to distribute derivative works

Funder Requirements
Increasing numbers of research funders stipulate the use of CC-BY when publishing via Open Access. Subsequently, IJPDS already offers the CC-BY licence to authors funded by RCUK / Wellcome Trust. We also use the CC0 “No rights reserved” licence for publishing source data that permits its re-use. IJPDS is now simply extending the right to freely access and use published research by rolling CC-BY out to cover all published works.

Benefits of CC-BY
By removing the restriction on derivative works, CC-BY opens up more options for using the research e.g. new ways of representing scholarly articles through text-mining and visualization techniques or allowing articles to be translated into other languages, and encouraging engagement with manuscripts through wider use has clear benefits to the authors.

Protecting Authors
Publishing under a free license does not mean that authors lose all their rights and any use of manuscripts published in IJPDS still require full attribution (i.e. giving credit and recognition to the author of a manuscript). Creative Commons licences require that no modifications to manuscripts should ‘be prejudicial to the Original Author’s honor or reputation’ (http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Frequently_Asked_Questions).

Please note that manuscripts already published IJPDS prior to Monday 12th November 2019 will remain as CC-BY-ND, unless we receive a request from the authors to change to CC-BY.

Guest post by Sharon Hindley, IJPDS Marketing Manager.
Tweet to @IJPDS

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Wellcome Trust new open access policy

open access

Wellcome Trust have just updated their open access policy which will last until Jan 2020. Although Swansea does not have a large number of Wellcome funded academics this is an interesting development as it follows a big review and is an attempt to work within the Plan S policy put forward by the European Commission.

  • It stipulates that articles must be freely available through PubMed Central as soon as they are published.
  • They have to be published under a CC-BY licence.
  • They will only fund articles in journals which appear in DOAJ and will not cover publishing in subscription journals.
  • All research articles will have to include a statement explaining how other researchers can access the data, software and materials underpinning the research.
  • They encourage publication of preprints under a CC-BY licence.
  • When they assess research outputs for funding they will judge on intrinsic merit, not the title of the journal or publisher.

As the cost of publishing in “hybrid” journals has kept rising and they are harder to discover than articles in fully open access journals this could be the start of a trend. One to watch….

 

 

 

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#ThesisThursday – Open Access Week 2018

Today is #ThesisThursday on Twitter, part of the activities celebrating International Open Access Week.

We asked our guest blogger Julia Terry to tell us about her recently completed Swansea University PhD.

College of Human and Health Sciences / Swansea University / 20th March 2018

What was the most important or overarching finding of your research?

My thesis focused on exploring talk about mental health nursing. I interviewed mental health service users, nurses and nursing students. In today’s healthcare climate we expect to see more practice that involves patients/service users in nursing processes. In Wales this is legislated for in mental health settings. However, my main finding was that there was limited talk about service user involvement in nursing processes and that involvement does not appear feature as a main part of mental health  nurses’ professional identity. Generally, service user involvement was spoken about very little, with service users voicing dissatisfaction with the limited time nurses spent with them, and nurses describing their roles as mostly task focussed.

What was the most surprising thing that you discovered; was there anything odd or unexpected?

It was surprising that nursing students said they had little understanding about service user involvement in nursing processes and had seen few good examples in practice. However, whilst these results were surprising, other studies in the UK have also found limited service user involvement in mental health care planning and that their expectations from nurses have not always been met.

What was the biggest challenge that you encountered during your PhD, and did it change the direction of your research?

The biggest challenge was the part-time nature of my PhD. I was very well supported and encouraged all the way through my journey. It was essential that I kept up my organisation and time management skills in order that I remained on track.

Have you any words of wisdom for any researchers who might be embarking on a similar programme of research?

Keeping a research log from the beginning is a good idea. I kept short notes on my progress all the way through and even took these in to my Viva exam. It means you have everything in one place, and can track your progress easily.

Read Julia’s thesis in our repository, Cronfa.

Title: Talking about mental health nursing: a qualitative analysis of nurses’ and service users’ accounts

Supervisors: Professor Michael Coffey & Dr Jeanette Hewitt

Link:  https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa43230

posted by Caroline Rauter

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Open Access – not just for REF

 

Open_Access_Week_-_Web_HeaderWe often come across staff who think they only need to deposit their work in RIS if they will be putting it forward for the REF. However, open access can give higher visibility and increased impact. It is increasingly required by government and funders, and  university policy. It also contributes to the democratization of research since articles are free to all.

Ideally you should build open access into your research cycle:

  • Producing a proposal – do you have  funds for article processing charges? Does your funder have open access requirements you need to meet (You can check using Sherpa Juliet)
  • Literature review – you might want to search the open access aggregator CORE 
  • Collecting dataopen research data is increasingly on the agenda of funders.
  • Writing up – does your chosen journal meet your funder’s criteria.

University open access policy states that “Wherever possible researchers will be expected to make all published research outputs available as Green Open Access” with the aim to “collect, disseminate and promote the scholarly output of the university’s staff as widely as possible”

Why wouldn’t you publish open access?

  • It’s complicated and I don’t understand what my publisher allows.
  • I have no funding
    • if you are funded by UKRI we can pay an APC for you. If you are not eligible for this you can deposit your accepted manuscript in the Research Information System to make your work open access, perhaps after an embargo period.
  • I think it limits my choice of journal
    •  if you use the green route of depositing in a repository, most journals allow open access so it shouldn’t have a significant effect on your freedom to publish where you wish.

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REF Open Access policy: determining the date of acceptance

Calendar

A key feature of the REF Open Access policy is that papers must be deposited in RIS within three months of acceptance for publication. We therefore need to record the date of acceptance in RIS for every journal articles (or serial conference proceedings paper) so that we can prove this was done. For many papers, the date of acceptance is displayed on the publisher site or PDF. For some journals however it is not easy to determine what qualifies as the “date of acceptance”, particularly if an article has been requested or the route to publication is not straightforward.

The REF Draft Guidance available now has this to say about dates of acceptance:

‘Date of acceptance’ means the date given in the acceptance letter or email from
the publisher to the author as the ‘firm’ accepted date.

They go on to clarify:

Outputs that are published by a journal or conference proceedings which does not require peer review are within the scope of this policy. In this instance, the author’s final accepted version must be deposited. The date of acceptance in this instance should be taken as the date that the publisher confirms that the article has been received from the author and will subsequently be published.

If you are still unsure what counts as the date of acceptance, please get in touch with the Library Research Support Team and we can advise.

 

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Swansea University’s electronic theses: find out more

books classroom college desk

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Swansea University introduced a new electronic thesis submission process in 2017 so all new students are required to make their thesis open access on Cronfa (unless there is a compelling reason not to). Our growing collection of open access theses showcases the excellent research outputs of our students and the university’s commitment to open research.

It’s important that all those involved in the process – students, supervisors, administrators – understand what is required in terms of the submission process and considerations around copyright. There is information on the E-theses Libguide and we are also running a session on Wednesday 3rd October 2-3pm on Park Campus in Training Room 1, Level 2 West, Library & Information centre. Sign up via ABW (staff only) or just come along!

Contact the Library Research Support Team for more information: iss-research@swansea.ac.uk

 

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Making a paper open access step-by-step

This post is a walk-through of the process for making a journal article open access on our institutional repository, as required by REF / SU’s open access policy.

If you can pay for “Gold” open access with the publisher (including a CC-BY licence), then your paper will be compliant. You may wish to consider using one of the Springer journals covered by the UK open access agreement with that publisher. This gives free open access publication to SU staff and students in one of the applicable titles. We have funding for open access for UKRI researchers.

Scenario: you have written an article and you want to submit it for publication.

Check that the journal allows you to comply with open access requirements: use Sherpa Romeo. If you have a research funder, check your funder’s policy as it is likely to have more restrictions.

Points to check on Sherpa Romeo are:

  1. If there is an embargo period, is it longer than 12 months (STEM) or 24 months (social science/humanities)? If so, this will not comply with the REF open access policy. You can still submit to the journal but you will need to produce evidence for the REF that you considered other journals and only this one was suitable.
  2. Do they allow you to upload the accepted version (post-print) onto an institutional repository at a minimum? Published version would be even better. If not, you can still submit to the journal but you will need to produce evidence for the REF that you considered other journals and only this one was suitable.

Acceptance: Your paper is peer reviewed, a few changes are requested and then you are contacted to say the paper has been accepted.

  1. Create a record on RIS with the information you have: title, journal, date of acceptance.
  2. Upload the accepted version: this is your final version which includes any changes made following peer review. Convert a Word document to PDF. If you are allowed to make your paper immediately available before publication, use the “Publish to Cronfa” link next to the file in RIS to make it appear the next day.

Your paper is finally published (either online, early, or in an issue of the journal).

  • Once the article is published, use the “Publish to Cronfa” link next to the file in RIS to set your full text file to release to Cronfa either immediately (if there is no embargo) or on a date in the future.

Whenever your paper becomes open access, be sure to promote it with a link to the Cronfa page so that readers can find the full text. You can track views and downloads on Cronfa and there will also be information on altmetrics (social media activity) and citations if these accrue.

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